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#62073 - 08/23/04 03:00 AM Re: Wine is Bottled Poetry
FishDreamer Administrator
Ching Shih


Registered: 08/27/01
Posts: 2804
Loc: Windy City USA

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Has anyone ever tried a vinho verde? I grabbed a bottle on sale this evening because the description sounded so good for a hot summer day, and because it's such a pretty pale green color. I don't normally drink non-reds, but I'm trying to expand my repertoire for summer wines. I just don't want to offer it up to someone only to find out instead of "crisp and refreshing like a fresh green apple" like the wine merchant claimed, it's sour and vinegary.

I also grabbed two bottles of white Cotes du Rhone (thanks to Catness) and three French pink wines, including an intriguing pink Cotes du Rhone. I love the red version, and the white I had chez Catness on Independence Day so I know it's good, and thus I must try the pink.

My objection to white was never about style or status (although if I never have to hear an understimulated Lady Who Lunches order "reisling" again I'll really be happy). I just find white wine goes sour in my stomach and doesn't taste good to me, generally.

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#62074 - 08/23/04 03:06 AM Re: Wine is Bottled Poetry
Fiordiligi
Ching Shih


Registered: 11/25/03
Posts: 206
Loc: London, UK

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Fishdreamer vinho verde was popular in the UK in the 70s but I don't think you see it around much now. I remember it as pleasant enough but I'm not much of a white wine drinker these days.

If I do have a white, it's a Gewurztraminer from Alsace with Indian food or a Sancerre or Macon blanc. I can't be doing with the chardonnay grape - it gives me a dreadful headache. The sauvignon blanc grape is much better for me.

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#62075 - 08/23/04 10:43 AM Re: Wine is Bottled Poetry
TraceyB
Ching Shih


Registered: 06/06/00
Posts: 1483
Loc: Minneapolis, MN

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 Quote:
Has anyone ever tried a vinho verde?
I used to drink vinho verde when I lived in the Azores. It was a nice light wine, very pleasant in the summer. The couple who reviews wines for The Wall Street Journal recommended vinho verdes for summertime a few years ago (back in 99, maybe; I remember the article because it was the only time I'd ever seen an American wine guru mention the stuff).

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#62076 - 08/23/04 02:06 PM Re: Wine is Bottled Poetry
melsy
Ching Shih


Registered: 07/05/03
Posts: 60
Loc: Canada

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This is a great thread. I think I'm going to have to stop by the Liquor Store this evening and pick up a bottle of something....

I tried a lovely Australian red over the weekend and thought I should share: Black Swan Shiraz. I tried the Cabernet as well but it wasn't quite as nice as the Shiraz.

I love red wine. It feels so decadent that it's such a nice way to treat myself. I have noticed though that Merlot gives me headaches for some reason. Has anyone else had that reaction? I've even tried a number of different merlots but it's always the same thing.

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#62077 - 10/21/04 11:12 PM Re: Wine is Bottled Poetry
FishDreamer Administrator
Ching Shih


Registered: 08/27/01
Posts: 2804
Loc: Windy City USA

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I don't mean to come around and just bump all the alcoholic threads, but I have a question. I just opened a bottle of beaujolais-villages and it appears to have spontaneously gone fizzy. Is this bad? Or is it just that I now have a bottle of random red French champagne?

It's a little fizzy on the tongue, and the contents of the bottle bubbled up in the center when I vacuumed the stopper. It tastes a little more sour than I expected, but not like it's actually bad.

ETA: It stopped being fizzy after a while, and started tasting like crap. I think the fizz was obscuring the flavor. Bleah.

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#62078 - 10/22/04 07:32 AM Re: Wine is Bottled Poetry
Fiordiligi
Ching Shih


Registered: 11/25/03
Posts: 206
Loc: London, UK

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FishDreamer I don't mind if you open up all the alcoholic threads! Some young wines are often slightly "prickly" on the tongue (petillant) and can be very pleasant. I wouldn't, however, expect it in a Beaujolais Villages so I think you just got a bad one. What a shame. I'm partial to a nice BV!
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#62079 - 10/22/04 12:20 PM Re: Wine is Bottled Poetry
listersgirl
Ching Shih


Registered: 12/10/00
Posts: 341
Loc: Toronto

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So, since this is a book forum, does anyone have a good book they can recommend to get me started? I only really just started drinking wine, and I'd love a little more information on what the different kinds generally taste like, so I can figure out where to start.

At the moment, all I really know is that I generally prefer red, I really don't like Chardonnay, and I had a rosť once that I loved and I wish I'd written down the name. But I'd like to know the difference between Shiraz and Merlot, and Riesling and Pinot Grigio, before I start haunting the liquor store.

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#62080 - 10/22/04 12:39 PM Re: Wine is Bottled Poetry
GingerCat
Ching Shih


Registered: 04/12/03
Posts: 784
Loc: Philadelphia

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listersgirl, I really liked Great Wine Made Simple by Andrea Immer. I thought it had a lot of useful information for a beginner, but without being too overwhelming.
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#62081 - 10/28/04 03:16 PM Re: Wine is Bottled Poetry
listersgirl
Ching Shih


Registered: 12/10/00
Posts: 341
Loc: Toronto

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Thanks, GingerCat, I'll look out for that one.
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#62082 - 10/28/04 05:32 PM Re: Wine is Bottled Poetry
polly#2
Ching Shih


Registered: 06/21/04
Posts: 135
Loc: Ireland

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I like Hugh Johnson's writing style. He used to do one big simple book called Wine which was a comprehensive reference, all grape varieties, all round the wine producing world, but which didn't make your head hurt.

At some point after 1981 it split into three big books Wine Encyclopedia, Wine Atlas, Story of Wine plus the Handbook

This may be impractical, but if you came across a second hand earlier version of Wine it would be a good self-teaching manual.

Edited to add Iím enjoying Jancis Robinsonís Wine Tasting Workbook, which involves no work at all, only tasting of wine.

You can follow the book, and plan to taste wines in the order she suggests (she starts with the grapes she considers to be the very most recognizable and works along to more obscure).

Or, you can come home from work, open whatever you were going to open anyway, look at the colour, write it down, sniff deeply, write down the aromas, take a slurp, write that down. And then look up what she says. My goodness, that was supposed to taste like pineapples?

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